How to grow and care for Gerbera Daisy (Gerbera jamesonii) Indoors

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Gerbera Daisy Care, Gerbera jamesonii Care

Botanical name: Gerbera jamesonii
Family: Asteraceae
Common names: Gerbera Daisy, Barbeton Daisy, Transvaal Daisy

Gerbera Daisy Description

Gerbera Daisy also called Barbeton Daisy or Transvaal Daisy is an ideal flowering houseplant for the well-lit spot. The striking flowers in Gerbera Daisy are a pleasant sight to behold. There are many colorful Gerbera Daisy plants available.

The flower colors in Gerbera Daisy range from soft pink, white, pale yellow, pink, orange, red and purple. The hybrids are more compact and produce up to six blooms at a time.

To get more blooms in Gerbera Daisy, once a flower fades, cut off the flower stalk at the base to encourage more blooming.

Gerbera Daisy Size

Gerbera Daisy has been grown as a flowering pot plant for a long time and it grows to a height of 2 ft.

The leaves in Gerbera Daisy are about 6 in. long, deeply veined and soft and hairy on the undersides.

Gerbera Daisy Air Purifying

According to the NASA Clean Air Study, Gerbera jamesonii was found to get rid of common VOCs specifically formaldehyde and benzene from indoor air.

Gerbera Daisy Origin

Gerbera Daisy is native to South Eastern Africa. It was first described by Robert Jameson in 1889 while exploring the Barberton area of South Africa.

Gerbera Daisy Care, Gerbera jamesonii Care

Gerbera Daisy (Gerbera jamesonii) Care Indoors

Gerbera Daisy Light Requirements

Gerbera Daisy grows best in bright light with some direct sunlight. Regularly turn the pot to ensure the plant gets adequate light on all sides to prevent lopsided growth. Check out this guide on understanding light for houseplants.

How to Water Gerbera Daisy

Keep the soil consistently moist for Gerbera Daisy while allowing the top 2-3 in. of soil to dry out between waterings.

Reduce watering for your Gerbera Daisy during the cold season as growth is minimal at this time. Read more on how to water houseplants.

Ensure the pot for your Gerbera Daisy has a drainage hole to prevent the soil from getting soggy as it can lead to root-rot disease and eventual death of your plant.

Avoid wetting the crown of your Gerbera Daisy as it can lead to crown and stem rot disease.


Temperature for Gerbera Daisy

Gerbera Daisy prefers average warmth between 15-250C. Protect your Gerbera Daisy from cold and hot draughts to prevent sudden changes in temperature. Read more on understanding temperature for houseplants.

Humidity for Gerbera Daisy

Gerbera Daisy has no need for high humidity. However, where the air is too dry due to high temperature, set the pot on a wet pebble tray to raise humidity for your Gerbera Daisy. Read more on how to raise humidity for houseplants.

Regularly clean the leaves of your Gerbera Daisy by damp-wiping with a soft cloth. Read more on how to clean houseplants.

Ensure that there is good air circulation for your Gerbera Daisy to prevent fungal diseases.

Fertilizer (Feeding) for Gerbera Daisy

Feed Gerbera Daisy every 3 weeks with a balanced fertilizer during the growing season. Withhold feeding during the cold season as growth is minimal at this time. Read more on how to feed houseplants.

How to Repot Gerbera Daisy

Repot Gerbera Daisy only when the plant is extremely pot-bound as it blooms more when slightly pot-bound.

Do not repot a Gerbera Daisy that is in flower as it can shorten the flowering period.

Repot your Gerbera Daisy into a pot 1 size larger and one that has a drainage hole to prevent the soil from getting soggy as it can lead to root-rot disease and eventual death of your plant.

The best soil for your Gerbera Daisy should be rich in organic matter and free-draining.

How to Prune Gerbera Daisy

Pruning Gerbera Daisy is easy. Cut off the flower stem at the base once flowering is over to encourage more blooms. Get rid of dead leaves to keep your plant neat and tidy. Read more on how to prune houseplants.

Gerbera Daisy (Gerbera jamesonii) Propagation

Gerbera Daisy can be propagated at the beginning of the growing season from seeds or by plant division.

How to propagate Gerbera Daisy from seeds

Spread Gerbera Daisy seeds evenly on moist free-draining soil and cover lightly withsome soil.

Cover the set up with a plastic sheet to create a greenhouse effect and place the set up in a warm brightly-lit place.

Maintain the soil moist through out by gently misting the soil surface.

Transplant the Gerbera Daisy plants when the seedlings are well established after which routine care can begin.

How to propagate Gerbera Daisy by plant division

Carefully divide a large Gerbera Daisy plant into sections while ensuring each section has some roots.

Pot these Gerbera Daisy sections into individual pots in moist free-draining soil.

Ensure the crown of leaves is above the soil surface to prevent rotting.

Place the set up in a warm brightly-lit place and maintain the soil moist until the new Gerbera Daisy plant is well established after which routine can begin.

Gerbera Daisy Care, Gerbera jamesonii Care

Gerbera Daisy (Gerbera jamesonii) Problems Indoors

Gerbera Daisy brown leaf tips and shrivelled leaf edges

Gerbera Daisy brown leaf tips and shrivelled leaf edges are due to two possible reasons

One possible reason for brown leaf tips and shrivelled leaf edges in your Gerbera Daisy is dry air resulting in low air humidity.

Set the pot on a wet pebble tray to raise humidity for your Gerbera daisy. Read more on how to raise himidity for houseplants.

The second possible reason for brown leaf tips and shrivelled leaf edges in your Gerbera Daisy is underwatering.

Maintain the soil consitently moist for your Gerbera Daisy and never allow the soil ball to dry out completely.

Gerbera Daisy brown leaf spots surrounded by lighter-colored borders

Gerbera Daisy brown leaf spots surrounded by lighter-colored borders are an indication of leaf spot disease.

Gerbera Daisy is prone to leaf spot disease in humid and warm conditions. Allow good air circulation around the plant to prevent leaf spot disease.

Gerbera Daisy limp leaves and rotten crown center

Gerbera Daisy limp leaves and rotten crown center are an indication of crown-rot disease due to wetting of the crown during watering.

Avoid wetting the crown of your Gerbera Daisy by watering it from the bottom instead.

Gerbera Daisy leaves and flowers moldy

Gerbera Daisy leaves and flowers moldy are an indication of botrytis disease or powdery mildew.

Do not mist Gerbera Daisy as moisture on the foliage creates suitable conditions for these diseases.

Cut off the diseased parts and keep your Gerbera Daisy warm while ensuring that there is good air circulation

Gerbera Daisy dying (plant collapse)

Gerbera Daisy dying (plant collapse) is an indication of root-rot disease which is brought about by soggy soil.

Isolate the affected plant to prevent spread to other houseplants and treat it appropriately for the disease.

Gerbera Daisy Pests

The common plant pests in Gerbera Daisy are Aphids, Fungus Gnats and Caterpillars.

Isolate the affected plant to prevent spread to other houseplants and treat it appropriately for the pests.

Is Gerbera Daisy (Gerbera jamesonii) toxic?

Gerbera Daisy (Gerbera jamesonii) plants are non-toxic to both humans and pets. They are safe to grow indoors.

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