How to Grow and Care for Teddy Bear Vine (Cyanotis kewensis) Indoors


Teddy Bear Vine, Cyanotis kewensis

Botanical name: Cyanotis kewensis
synonym Cyanotis beddomei
Family: Commelinaceae
Common name: Teddy Bear Vine

Description

Cyanotis kewensis commonly called Teddy Bear Vine is a succulent vine which bears oval-shaped, hairy (velvet-like) leaves with purple undersides and is ideal for a hanging basket or a groundcover.

Size

Teddy Bear Vine is a slow growing plant whose stems cascade downwards and are about 1-2 ft long which makes it is ideal for a hanging basket, a plant shelf or a tabletop.

Flower

The flowers in Teddy Bear Vine are about 1 in. mauve colored, blue-violet or pinkish-purple.

Origin

Cyanotis kewensis is native to South Africa.

Toxicity

Teddy Bear Vine (Cyanotis kewensis) is non-toxic to humans and pets according to Succulents Addiction. The plants are safe to grow indoors.

Similar Plants

Teddy Bear Vine is closely related to Pussy Ears Vine. The foliage in Cyanotis kewensis (Teddy Bear Vine) bears rusty brown hairs while Cyanotis somaliensis (Pussy Ears Vine) native to Somalia, has larger leaves and the hairs are pale grey.

At a glance Teddy Bear Vine resembles an Inch Plant save for its hairy foliage from which it has earned its common name.

Where to Buy

Would you like to add Teddy Bear Vine to your collection? Buy Teddy Bear Vine online from Etsy.

Teddy Bear Vine, Cyanotis kewensis

Cyanotis kewensis Care Indoors

Teddy Bear Vine (Cyanotis kewensis) requires bright, indirect light with some morning sunshine, moderate warmth and humidity, moderately moist, rich, well-drained soils and regular feeding during the growing season.

Cyanotis kewensis requires pruning to to encourage a compact growth and to rejuvenate growth. Repotting is only necessary when it becomes root-bound. Keep reading for more on these growing conditions and how to provide them.

Watering

Water Teddy Bear Vine liberally during the growing season and allow the top 2-3 in. of soil to dry out between waterings to keep the soil moderately moist.

Decrease watering in cold season to keep the soil slightly moist as growth is minimal at this time but do not allow the soil to dry out completely.

Make sure that the soil is free-draining and the pot has a drainage hole to prevent the soil from getting soggy as it can lead to rotting of the vine.

Light Requirements

Teddy Bear Vine grows best in bright, indirect light. Some morning sunshine is beneficial to enhance the leaf color.

Regularly rotate the pot to ensure that the plant receives light on all sides for uniform growth.

If the light is not adequate the plant exhibits leggy growth (long weak stems with widely spaced small leaves).

Where the natural lighting is not adequate, Teddy Bear Vine can be grown under a grow light to supplement it.

Temperature and Humidity

Cyanotis kewensis requires an average warmth within the range of 15-270C with a minimum of 130C inorder to thrive.

Teddy Bear Vine has no need for high humidity. Moderate air humidity is adequate for this plant.

However, when the temperatures are too high which can cause the air to be too dry, set the pot on a wet pebble tray or use a humidifier to up humidity. Check out these techniques on how to raise humidity for houseplants.

Potting Mix

Teddy Bear Vine grows best in loose and free-draining soil that is rich in organic matter. The soil should be loose enough to allow water to drain out fast enough to avoid soggy soil which can cause rotting.

Cactus and Succulents soil is ideal for this vine as it drains easily and does not hold excess moisture. Buy quality Cactus and Succulents Soil online from Etsy.

Fertilizer (Feeding)

Feed Cyanotis kewensis every 4 weeks during the growing period with a balanced, water-soluble fertilizer to promote a lush growth.

Stop feeding during the cold season as growth is minimal and feeding at this time can lead to fertlizer burn and eventual death of the plant.

Pruning

Pruning Teddy Bear Vine is easy. To encourage a compact, bushy growth and to prevent it from becoming leggy, regularly pinch off the growing tips.

The stems become leggy with age; cutback the stems to rejuvenate (encourage) new growth.

Repotting

Repot Cyanotis kewensis at the beginning of growing season when the plant becomes root-bound. A pot one size larger than the current one is adequate to avoid overpotting the plant.

Ensure that the pot has a drainage hole to prevent the soil from getting soggy as it can lead to rotting and eventual death of the plant.

Propagation

Teddy Bear Vine (Cyanotis kewensis) propagation can be done at the beginning of the growing season in two ways; by plant division or from stem cuttings.

Teddy Bear Vine, Cyanotis kewensis

Cyanotis kewensis Common Problems

Teddy Bear Vine (Cyanotis kewensis) growing problems include browing, brown leaf tips, leggy growth, leaf spots, pests and diseases among others. Continue reading for more on these problems, their remedies and solutions.

Plant turning brown

Teddy Bear Plant can turn brown due to a number of reasons. One reason why the plant may turn brown is soggy soil resulting in root-rot disease.

Carefully slip the plant out of its pot and inspect the roots. Brown-black mushy roots indicate root-rot, trim them off and treat the entire plant with a fungicidal solution.

Disinfect the pot with the fungicidal solution or use a fresh pot to repot the plant in fresh free-draining soil.

Do not water the plant and keep it dry for some time before resuming watering. Read more on how to deal with root-rot here.

Alternatively, if the plant is badly damaged, use the healthy stems to propagate new plants. Read on how to propagate Teddy Bear Vine from stem cuttings.

The second reason for browning in Teddy Bear Vine is underwatering. Underwatering means that there is too little moisture in the soil.

As such, the plant cannot take up nutrients and water to the leaves. Therefore, they wilt, turn brown and die.

Teddy Bear Vine needs to be watered liberally until water comes out through the drainage holes while allowing the top 2-3 in. of soil to dry out between waterings to keep the soil moderately moist.

Cut down on watering in cold season to keep the soil slightly moist as growth is minimal at this time but never allow the soil to dry out completely.

Read more on 9 Reasons Why Teddy Bear Vine is Turning Brown and their Solutions

Limp (droopy) stems, yellow and spotted leaves

Teddy Bear Vine limp (droopy) stems, yellow and spotted leaves are caused by underwatering.

Underwatering results in too little moisture in the root zone which means that there is little water for the plant to take up to the leaves.

Therefore, the leaves and stems lose their turgidity (firmness) and they droop (limp).

Immediately water the plant thoroughly and it should recover. Thereafter, water it liberally during the growing season and allow the top 2-3 in. of soil to dry out between waterings.

Water less in cold season to maintain the soil slightly moist but never allow the soil to dry out completely.

Leggy growth

Teddy Bear Vine leggy growth (long weak stems with widely spaced undersize leaves) are due to four possible reasons.

One possible reason for leggy growth is age. As the plant ages, the stems become leggy. Cutback the stems to rejuvenate new growth.

The second possible reason for leggy growth in Teddy Bear Vine is too little light as it grows best in bright, indirect light with some sunshine to enhance leaf color.

Move it to a brighter spots where it can receive bright, indirect light or instal a grow light to supplement the natural light.

The third possible reason for leggy growth in Teddy Bear Vine is underwatering which results in too little moisture in the root zone.

Thoroughly water the plant immediately and it should recover. Thereafter, water the vine liberally during the growing season and allow the top 2-3 in. of soil to dry out between waterings.

Cut down on watering in cold season to keep the soil slightly moist but do not allow the soil to dry out completely.

The fourth possible reason for leggy growth in Teddy Bear Vine is inadequate feeding (underfeeding) which means the plant is not getting adequate nutrients for growth.

If the plant does not get enough nutrients it becomes stunted and produces small-sized leaves and weak stems.

Feed the vine with a balanced, water-soluble fertilizer every 4 weeks during the growing season.

However, withhold feeding in the cold season as growth is minimal at this time and feeding can lead to fertlizer burn.

Brown, shrivelled leaf tips

Teddy Bear vine brown, shrivelled leaf tips are caused by too dry air (low humidity) especially when the temperatures are too high. High temperature will cause the air to be too dry.

To increase humidity for your Teddy Bear Vine, set the pot on a wet pebble tray or use a cool mist humidifier.

Diseases

Teddy Bear Vine is quite disease tolerant. However, it is prone to root-rot disease which is caused by soggy soil and overwatering under low temperature during the cold season.

Lessen watering in the cold season to maintain the soil barely moist. In addition, ensure that the pot has a drainage hole and the soil is free-draining to prevent it from getting soggy.

Pests

The common pests in Teddy Bear Vine are aphids and spider mites. Isolate the affected plant to prevent spread to the other houseplants and treat it with a horticultural oil as per the manufacturer's recommendations.

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