How to Grow and Care for Bush Lily (Clivia miniata) Indoors


Bush Lily, Clivia miniata

Botanical name: Clivia miniata
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Common names: Bush Lily, Natal Lily

Description

Bush Lily (Clivia miniata) also called Natal Lily is an easy to grow flowering plant which bears large clusters of flowers and easily adapts to indoor growing conditions.

Natal Lily is a sensitive plant which does not like to be disturbed therefore, don't move the plant when in bud or flower and don't repot unless the plant is pushing out of the container.

However, when given the right conditions Bush Lily grows into large clumps. The plant spreads by means of rhizomes and is suitable for shaded spots.

Size

Clivia miniata grows to a height of 18 in. and the flowers about 10-20 are borne on top of a tall stalk.

Flower

The flowers in Bush Lily are orange, red, cream and yellow, and may have a faint but very sweet perfume. The flowers about 10-20 are borne on top of a tall stalk.

Natal Lily will not bloom when temperatures are high or if the watering rules are not followed.

Origin

Clivia miniata is native to the woodland habitats of South Africa as well as Swaziland.

Toxicity

Bush Lily (Clivia miniata) contains small amounts of lycorine which makes it toxic to both humans and pets as indicated by ASPCA. Keep it away from the reach of children and pets.

Where to Buy

Bush Lily in various sizes and colors are available online at Etsy. Purchase beautiful Bush Lily online from Etsy.

Bush Lily, Clivia miniata

Bush Lily Care Indoors

Bush Lily (Clivia miniata) thrives in bright light with some direct sunlight, warm conditions and moderately moist, rich, well-drained soils coupled with regular feeding during the growing season.

Natal Lily does not like too frequent repotting as it blooms best when pot-bound. Pruning is needed to keep the plant neat and also reduce pest and disease infestations. Keep reading for more on these growing conditions and how to provide them.

Light Requirements

Bush Lily grows best in bright light with some direct morning or late afternoon sunshine to promote flowering.

Keep it away from hot direct sunlight as it will cause scorching and yellowish, washed out leaves.

Regularly rotate the pot to ensure the plant receives light on all sides for even growth.

Clivia miniata will also grow under a grow light where the natural light is not sufficient.

Watering

Water Bush Lily thoroughly during the growing season while allowing the top 2-3 in. of soil to dry out between watering to keep the soil moderately moist through out.

Decrease watering in the cold season to maintain the soil barely moist as growth is minimal at this time but do not allow it to dry out completely.

Confirm that the pot has a drainage hole to prevent the soil from getting soggy as it can result in root-rot disease.

Temperature

Average room temperature with a minimum of 100C is ideal for Bush Lily. Keep it away from cold drafts as they can cause flowerbud drop and reduced growth.

Humidity

Average room humidity is ideal for Bush Lily. The plant has no need for high humidity.

Soil

The best soil for Bush Lily should be rich in organic matter and free-draining to prevent it from getting soggy while providing the required nutrients.

Most multi-purpose potting mixes are ideal for this plant . Buy quality potting mix for Natal Lily online from Etsy.

Fertilizer (Feeding)

Feed Bush Lily with a phosphorous-rich, water-soluble fertilizer every 2-3 weeks during the growing season. Do not feed during the cold period as growth is minimal at this time.

Repotting

Repot Bush Lily after flowering into a pot one size larger than the current one, only when the plant becomes pot-bound. Being pot-bound is important as it encourages flowering.

Ensure the pot has a drainage hole and the soil is free-draining soil to avoid getting soggy soil as it can lead to root-rot disease and eventual death of the plant.

Do not repot a plant that is in flower as the repotting shock can cause flowerbud drop and short flowering period.

Pruning

Pruning Clivia miniata involves removal of dead blooms and leaves to keep the plant neat and reduce pest and disease infestations. Cutback the leaves at the base when they begin to shrivel.

Propagation

Bush Lily (Clivia miniata) can be propagated by plant division at repotting time.

How to propagate Bush Lily by plant division

Carefully divide the Bush Lily rhizome into sections while ensuring each section has adequate roots and some leaves.

Pot these sections in moist, well-drained soil in individual pots. Ensure each pot has a drainage hole to avoid getting soggy soil as it can lead to rotting.

Place the set up in a warm, well-lit place away from direct sunlight and maintain the soil moist thorough out.

Allow the new Natal Lily plants to be well established before transplanting after which you can begin routine care.

Bush Lily, Clivia miniata

Bush Lily Problems

Bush Lily (Clivia miniata) problems include brown leaves, yellow leaves, flowerbud drop, lack of blooms, pests and diseases. Keep reading for more on these problems, their remedies and solutions.

No blooms

There are five possible reasons why Bush Lily will not bloom (flower). One possible reason is too frequent repotting as it flowers best when pot-bound.

Repot the plant only when it is extremely pot-bound. Being pot-bound is important to encourage flowering.

The second possible reason why Natal Lily will not bloom (flower) is underfeeding. Feed it with a phosphorous-rich, water-soluble fertilizer every 2-3 weeks during the growing season to encourage flowering.

The third possible reason why Bush Lily is not blooming (flowering) is underwatering (too little moisture in the soil).

Water the Natal Lily thoroughly during the growing season while allowing the top 2-3 in. of soil to dry out between waterings to maintain the soil moderately moist through out.

Cut down on watering in the cold period to keep the soil slightly moist but do not allow it to dry out completely.

The fourth possible reason why Bush Lily will not bloom (flower) is too high temperature due to hot drafts.

Maintain an average room temperature with a minimum of 100C and protect the plant from hot drafts like hot air vents, hot surfaces and others.

The fifth possible reason why Bush Lily will not bloom (flower) is too little light as it blooms best under bright light with some direct sunshine.

Move the plant to a brighter spot where it will receive bright light with some direct sunshine or instal a grow light if the natural lighting is not adequate.

Flowerbud drop

There are three possible reasons for flowerbud drop in Bush Lily. One possible reason for flower bud drop is underwatering.

Water the plant thoroughly until the water comes out through the drainage holes. Maintain the soil moderately moist and never allow the soil ball to dry out completely.

The second possible reasons for flowerbud drop in Bush Lily is underfeeding.

Feed it every 2-3 weeks during the growing season with a phosphorous-rich, water-soluble fertilizer to promote flowering.

The third possible reasons for flowerbud drop in Bush Lily is sudden change in temperature due to cold drafts.

Keep the plant away from cold draughts to maintain an average room temperature and do not move it when in bud.

Brown leaf marks

One cause of brown leaf marks in Bush Lily is exposure to hot direct sunshine. Grow Bush Lily under bright light with some direct sunlight but away from hot direct sunshine.

The second cause of brown leaf marks in Bush Lily is soggy soil brought about by poor quality soil. Use loose, well-drained soil and ensure that the pot has a drainage hole to prevent the soil from getting soggy.

Yellowish, washed out leaves

Yellowish, washed out leaves in Bush Lily are an indication of exposure of the plant to too hot sunshine. Move the plant to a shadier spot or shield it from hot direct sunshine.

Yellowing leaves

Yellowing leaves in Bush Lily are an indication of root-rot disease. The leaves begin wilting, turn yellow and rot if the situation is not corrected.

The root-rot disease is a common disease in Natal Lily if the soil becomes soggy (holds too much water).

Make sure that the pot has a drainage hole and the soil is free-draining. Read more on how to treat root-rot disease in houseplants.

Diseases

Apart from root-rot disease, Bush Lily is also prone to damping off, leaf rust and leaf spot which are promoted by overwet conditions coupled with poor air circulation.

Ascertain that the pot has a drainage hole to prevent the soil from getting soggy and reduce watering during the cold season as growth is minimal at this time.

Do not mist the leaves and ensure that there is good air circulation to prevent disease infestations. Read on how to identify and treat diseases in houseplants.

Pests

Bush Lily is prone to Mealy Bugs. Isolate the affected plant to prevent spread to other houseplants and treat it appropriately for the pests.

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