How to Grow and Care for Bleeding Glory Vine (Clerodendrum thomsoniae) Indoors


Bleeding Glory Vine, Clerodendrum thomsoniae

Botanical name: Clerodendrum thomsoniae
Family: Lamiaceae
Common names: Bleeding Glory Vine, Bleeding Glorybower, Tropical Bleeding Heart, Bagflower, Harlequin Glorybower

Description

Clerodendrum thomsoniae commonly called Bleeding Glory Vine, Bleeding Glorybower, Tropical Bleeding Heart, Bagflower or Harlequin Glorybower is a perennial climbing plant which bears two-colored flowers.

The flowers are red and surrounded by white sepals. They are borne in terminal clusters of 8-20 in spring and summer. The blooms appear bell-shaped and are lightly scented.

The common name, 'Bleeding Heart', is in reference to the red flowers which look like a drop of red blood emerging from the calyx.

Clerodendrum thomsoniae was so named at the request of Rev. William Cooper Thomson (1829-1878), a missionary and physcian in Nigeria in honour of his first wife who had passed on.

Bleeding Glory Vine is a fast-growing vine which climbs by means of tendrils. The plant is ideal for a hanging basket, a pedestal or a table-top where the stems can beautifully cascade downwards. It also looks beautiful on a trellis.

Bleeding Glorybower can also be grown as a bushy climber by regularly pinching the growing tips and cutting back the stems when they overgrow.

Size

In its native habitat, Harlequin Glorybower can grow to a height of up to 18 ft but when grown indoors it can grow to about 6 ft. The leaves are deeply-veined, glossy, dark-green, ovate, about 5-7 in. long, with smooth edges.

Varieties

There are two known varieties of Tropical Bleeding Heart. Clerodendrum thomsoniae 'Variegatum' with cream-edged leaves and Clerodendrum thomsoniae 'Delectum' whose flowers are a lighter shade of red.

Origin

Clerodendrum thomsoniae is native to West Africa from Cameroon to Senegal.

Toxicity

According to Gardnersworld.com, Bleeding Glory Vine (Clerodendrum thomsoniae) has no toxic effects reported.

Where to Buy

If you would like to add this beauty to your collection, check out this Link to Etsy Shops.

Bleeding Glory Vine, Clerodendrum thomsoniae

Clerodendrum thomsoniae Care Indoors

Bleeding Glory Vine (Clerodendrum thomsoniae) blossoms in bright, indirect light away from direct sunlight, warm and humid conditions and consistently moist, fertile, well-drained soil coupled with regular feeding during the growing season.

Clerodendrum thomsoniae requires regular pruning to keep it neat, to reduce pest infestations as well as promote flowering. Repotting is only necessary when the plant is extremely pot-bound as it blooms best when root-bound. Keep reading for more on these growing conditions and how to achieve them.

Watering

Water Bleeding Glory Vine thoroughly (until the water comes out through the drainage holes) during the growing season and keep the soil consistently moist through out.

Reduce watering during the cold season to maintain the soil slightly moist as growth is minimal at this time but do not let it dry out completely as it can lead to wilting and leaf drop.

Ascertain that the soil is free-draining and the pot has a drainage hole to avoid getting soggy soil as it can lead to root-rot and eventual death of the plant.

Light Requirements

Bleeding Glory Vine grows best in bright, indirect light away from direct sunlight as it can scorch the leaves.

If light is not enough, Bleeding Glorybower will become leggy with wide spaces between the leaf nodes and will not bloom.

Turn the pot regularly to ensure the plant receives light on all sides for even growth.

Clerodendrum thomsoniae can also grow under a grow light where the natural light is not sufficient.

Temperature and Humidity

Average room temperature within the range of 16-280C is ideal for Bleeding Glory Vine. Keep it away from draughty conditions as cold temperatures can cause leaf drop.

Average to above average room humidity is ideal for Bleeding Glory Vine. The Vine thrives in warm, humid conditions like in its natural environment. Low humidity will cause the plant to develop brown leaf tips and edges.

To elevate humidity especially where the room temperatures are very high, like in winter, set the pot on a wet pebble tray or use a cool mist humidifier. Check out these techniques on how to raise humidity for houseplants.

Fertilizer

Feed Clerodendrum thomsoniae every 4 weeks during the growing season with a phosphorous-rich, water-soluble fertilizer to promote flowering. Do not feed during the cold season as growth is minimal at this time.

Pruning

Prune Bleeding Glory Vine by removing dead blooms and leaves to maintain the plant neat and as well as reduce pest and disease infestations.

Cutback the stems by half at the beginning of the growing season to promote flowering as the flowers grow from a point just below the growing tips.

Potting Soil

The best soil for Bleeding Glory Vine should be rich in organic matter and free-draining to prevent it from getting soggy while providing the required nutrients.

Most multi-purpose potting mixes are ideal for Bleeding Glorybower. Buy quality potting mix online from Etsy.

Repotting

Repot Bleeding Glory Vine at the beginning of the growing season into a pot one size larger than the current one only when the plant becomes extremely pot-bound. The plant blooms best when root-bound.

Ensure that the pot has a drainage hole and the soil is free-draining soil to avoid having soggy soil as it can lead to root-rot.

Do not repot a plant that is in flower as the repotting shock can shorten the flowering period.

Take care not to expose the roots to dry air while repotting as it can easily get repotting shock.

Keep the roots moist by covering them with a wet towel or by ensuring that there is a ball of soil around them.

Propagation

Bleeding Glory Vine (Clerodendrum thomsoniae) can be propagated at the beginning of the growing season from stem cuttings.

How to propagate Bleeding Glory Vine from stem cuttings

Take a 4-6 stem cuttings from a healthy Bleeding Glory Vine. Strip off the lower leaves of the cuttings and coat the lower part of the stem with a rooting hormone.

Carefully insert the coated cuttings in moist, free-draining soil and ensure the rooting container has adequate drainage holes to prevent the soil from getting soggy as it can lead to rotting.

Place the set up in a warm, brightly-lit spot and maintain the soil moist through out until the cuttings are rooted. Rooting should occur in about 2 weeks.

Allow the new Bleeding Glorybower to be well established before transplanting after which you can begin routine care.

Bleeding Glory Vine, Clerodendrum thomsoniae

Clerodendrum thomsoniae Common Problems

Bleeding Glory Vine (Clerodendrum thomsoniae) growing problems include wilting, drooping leaves, brown leaf tips, lack of blooms, yellowing leaves, pests and diseases among others. Continue reading for more on these problems and how to solve them.

Wilting and droopy leaves

Wilting and droopy leaves in Bleeding Glory Vine are caused by underwatering which results in too little moisture in the soil.

Therefore, the plant does not get enough water to take up to the leaves. As such, they lose their stiffness, they wilt and droop.

Water the Bleeding Glorybower thoroughly and maintain the soil consistently moist during the growing season.

Cut down on watering during the cold season to keep the soil slightly moist but do not allow the soil to dry out completely.

No blooms

The are four possible causes of lack of blooms in Bleeding Glory Vine. One possible cause of lack of blooms is too little light.

Position the Bleeding Glorybower in a brighter spot where it will receive bright, indirect light or instal a grow light if the natural lighting is not adequate.

The second possible cause of lack of blooms in Bleeding Glory Vine is feeding it with a nitrogen-rich fertilizer which promotes foliage growth at the expense of flowering.

Feed the Bleeding Glorybower with a phosphorous-rich, water-soluble fertilizer every 4 weeks during the growing season to promote flowering.

The third possible reason why Bleeding Glory Vine will not bloom is underwatering.

Water the Bleeding Glorybower thoroughly during the growing season and keep the soil consistently moist through out.

However, decrease watering during the cold season to maintain the soil slightly moist but do not allow it to dry out completely.

The fourth possible reason why Bleeding Glorybower will not bloom is too frequent repotting.

Repot the plant only when it is extremely pot-bound as it blooms best when root-bound.

Brown leaf tips

Brown leaf tips in Bleeding Glory Vine are due to two possible reasons. One possible reason for brown leaf tips is dry air (low humidity).

To increase humidity, set the pot on a wet pebble tray to raise humidity or use a cool mist humidifier.

The second possible reason for brown leaf tips in Bleeding Glorybower is soggy soil (too wet soil).

Maintain the soil consistently moist during the growing season and slightly moist during the cold period but never allow it to be soggy.

Always ensure that the pot has a drainage hole and that the soil is free-draining (drains easily) to prevent it from getting soggy.

Leaves turning yellow

Naturally, the older leaves in Bleeding Glory Vine turn yellow. Cut away the yellow leaf at the base to keep the plant neat and tidy.

Excessive yellowing of leaves in Bleeding Glorybower is due to root-rot disease which is promoted by soggy soil.

Take the plant out of its pot and inspect the roots for root-rot disease. Mushy brown roots are indicative of root-rot disease.

Make sure that the pot has a drainage hole and the soil is free-draining. Read more on root-rot disease and how to treat it.

Pests

The common pests in Clerodendrum thomsoniae are Mealy Bugs, Scales and Spider Mites. Isolate the affected plant to prevent spread to the other houseplants and treat it appropriately for the pests. Read on how to identify and treat pests in houseplants.

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